Layer 2 VPN to the Cloud – Part II

Almost 3 years ago I have published an article how to set up layer 2 VPN between on-prem vSphere environment and vCloud Director Org VDC.

As both vCloud Director and NSX evolved quite a bit since to simplify the whole set up, here comes the part II.

Let me first summarize the use case:

The tenant has an application that resides on 3 different VLAN based networks running in its own (vSphere) datacenter. The networks are routed with existing physical router. The tenant wants to extend 2 of these networks to cloud for cloud bursting or DR purposes, but not the 3rd one (for example because there runs a physical database server).

The following diagram shows the setup.

The main advancements are:

  • vCloud Director natively supports NSX L2 VPN (VCD 8.20 or newer needed).
  • NSX now (since 6.2) supports configuration of unstretched networks directly (no static routes are necessary anymore)
  • This means the full setup can be done by the tenant in self-service fashion

Here are the steps:

  • The tenant will deploy freely available NSX Standalone Edge in its datacenter connected to trunk port with 2 VLANs mapped (10 and 11). Additional network configuration is necessary (forged transmits and promiscuous mode or sink port creation – see the link)
  • In the cloud Org VDC tenant deploys two routed Org VDC networks with identical subnets and gateways as networks A and B. These networks must be connected to the Org VDC Edge GW via subinterface (there can be up to 200 such networks on single Edge). The Org VDC Edge must have advanced networking enabled.
  • Tenant enables and configures L2VPN server on its Org VDC Edge GW. Note that this is a premium feature that the service provider must enable in Organization first (see this blog post).
  • Before the L2VPN tunnel is established the following must be taken into account:
    • The Org VDC Edge GW IP addresses are identical with the on-prem existing physical router. Therefore Egress Optimization Gateway addresses must be entered in the Peer Site configuration. That will prevent the Org VDC Edge GW from sending ARP replies over the tunnel.
    • The same must be performed on the Standalone NSX Edge via CLI (see egress-optimize command here).
    • The non-stretched network (subnet C) must be configured on the Org VDC Edge GW so it knows that the subnet is reachable through the tunnel and not via its upstream interface(s). This option however is not in vCloud UI, instead vCloud networking API must be used.
      Edit 3/26/2018: This does not works for standalone NSX Edges. See the end of the article for more details.
      Alternatively the provider could configure non-stretched network directly in the NSX UI:
    • Finally, the tunnel can be established by configuring L2VPN server details on the on-prem Standalone NSX Edge L2VPN client (endpoint IP, port, credentials, encryption) and providing VLAN to tunnel mappings.
    • Note to find the Org VDC network subinterface tunnel mapping vCloud API must be used again:

Edit 3/26/2018:

After multiple questions regarding unstretched networks and some testing I need to make some clarifications.

The routing of unstretched networks through the tunnel is achieved via static routes configured on the Edge GW. So in principle it still works the same way as described in the original article, the difference doing it via UI/API is that the setting of the IPs and routes is automatic.

The server Edge routing table looks like this:


show ip route

S 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 10.0.2.254
C 10.0.2.0/24 [0/0] via 10.0.2.121
C 169.254.64.192/26 [0/0] via 169.254.64.193
C 169.254.255.248/30 [0/0] via 169.254.255.249
C 192.168.100.0/24 [0/0] via 192.168.100.1
C 192.168.101.0/24 [0/0] via 192.168.101.1
S 192.168.102.0/24 [1/0] via 169.254.64.194

show ip address

...

17: vNic_4094@br-sub: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
link/ether 00:50:56:88:31:21 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
inet 169.254.64.193/26 brd 169.254.64.255 scope global vNic_4094
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe88:3121/64 scope link
valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever

You can see that the 169.254.64.193 IP address was autoassigned to the 4096 tunnel interface and static route was set to route the unstretched network to the other side via IP 169.254.64.194. The assignment of the .194 address on the other Edge will happen only if that Edge is managed by NSX and is actually performing routing! This is in fact not true for the use case above (with standalone Edge and existing physical router). Therefore the following manual approach must be taken:

  1. Create Org VDC transit network with arbitrary small subnet (e.g. 169.254.200.0/29) in the cloud. Assign IP .1 as the gateway on the Org VDC Edge. This network will not be used for workloads, it is used just for routing to unstretched network.
  2. Create corresponding VLAN transit network on-prem. Assign IP .2 as its gateway interface on the existing router (note the IP addresses of the routing intefaces in #1 and #2 are different).
  3. Create L2 VPN tunnel as before, however also stretch the transit network but do not optimize its GW (no need as on-prem and cloud are using different IPs).
  4. Create static routes on the Org VDC Edge GW to route to on-prem unstretched networks  via the 169.254.200.2 transit network router IP.

Note that this is approach very similar to the original blog post. The only difference is that we must create separate transit network as vCloud Director does not support multiple subnets on the same Edge GW interface.

Advertisements

vCloud Director 9: NSX Distributed Logical Router

vCloud Director version 9 introduces support for the last major missing NSX feature – the distributed logical router (DLR). DLR provides optimized router which in distributed fashion performs routing between different logical switches in the hypervisor. The routing always happens in the hypervisor running the source VM which means that the traffic goes between maximum two ESXi hosts (source and destination) and no tromboning through third host running router VM is necessary. Read here for technical deep dive into how this works. This not only provides much better performance than traditional Edge GW routing, but also scales up to 1000 routed logical networks (as opposed to 10 on Edge GW or up to 209 if trunk port is enabled).

Generally, DLR should be used for routing only between VXLAN based logical switches, although NSX supports VLANs networks with certain caveats as well. Additionally dynamic routing protocols are supported as well and managed by Control VM of the DLR.

Now let’s look how vCloud Director implements DLR. The main focus was making DLR very simple to use and seamlessly integrate with the existing networking Org VDC concepts.

  • DLR is enabled on Org VDC Edge Gateway which must be already converted to advanced networking. You cannot use DLR without Org VDC Edge Gateway! There must be one free interface on the Edge (you will see later on why).
  • Once DLR is enabled, a logical DLR instance is created in NSX in headless mode without DLR Control VM (the instance is named in NSX vse-dlr-<GW name) (<UUID>)). vCloud Director can get away without Control VM as dynamic routing is not necessary – see later below.
  • The DLR instance uplink interface is connected to the Org VDC Edge GW with P2P connection using 10.255.255.248/30 subnet. The DLR uses .250 IP address and the Org VDC Edge GW uses .249. This subnet is hardcoded and cannot overlap with existing Org VDC Edge GW subnets. Obviously the Org VDC Edge GW needs at least one free interface.
  • DLR has default gateway set to the Org VDC Edge GW interface (10.255.255.249)
  • New Org VDC networks now can be created in the Org VDC with the choice to attach them to the Edge Gateway (as regular or subinterface in a trunk) or to attach them to the DLR instance.
    For each distributed Org VDC network a static route will be created on the Org VDC Edge Gateway to point to the DLR uplink interface. This means there is no need for dynamic routing protocols on the DLR instance.

    Static Routes on NSX Edge GW

In the diagram below is the networking topology of such setup.

In the example you can see three Org VDC networks. One (blue) traditional (10.10.10.0/24) attached directly to the Org VDC Edge GW and two (purple and orange) distributed (192.168.0.0/24 and 192.168.1.0/24) connected through the DLR instance. The P2P connection between Org VDC Edge GW and DLR instance is green.

  • DHCP relay agents are automatically configured on DLR instance for each distributed Org VDC network and point to DHCP Relay Server – the Org VDC Edge GW interface (10.255.255.249). To enable DHCP service for particular distributed Org VDC network, the DHCP Pool with proper IP Range just needs to be manually created on the Org VDC Edge Gateway. If Auto Configure DNS is enabled, DHCP will provide IP address of the Org VDC Edge P2P interface to the DLR instance.

    DHCP Configuration of DLR pools on the Edge GW

Considerations

  • Up to 1000 distributed Org VDC networks can be connected to one Org VDC Edge GW (one DLR instance per Org VDC Edge GW).
  • Some networking features (such as L2 VPN) are not supported on the distributed Org VDC networks.
  • VLAN based Org VDC networks cannot be distributed. The Org VDC must use VXLAN network pool.
  • IPv6 is not supported by DLR
  • vApp routed networks cannot be distributed
  • The tenant can override the automatic DHCP and static route configurations done by vCloud Director for distributed networks on the Org VDC Edge GW. The tenant cannot modify the P2P connection between the Edge and DLR instance.
  • Disabling DLR on Org VDC Edge Gateways is possible but all distributed networks must be removed before.
  • Both enabling and disabling DLR on Org VDC Edge Gateway are by default system administrator only operations. It is possible to grant these rights to a tenant with the granular RBAC introduced in vCloud Director 8.20.
  • DLR feature is in the base NSX license in the VMware Cloud Provider Program.

Edit 02/10/2017: Engineering (Abhinav Mishra) provided a way how to change P2P subnet between the Edge and DLR. Add the following property value with CMT:

$VCLOUD_HOME/bin/cell-management-tool manage-config -n gateway.dlr.default.subnet.cidr -v <subnet CIDR>

Example: $VCLOUD_HOME/bin/cell-management-tool manage-config -n gateway.dlr.default.subnet.cidr -v 169.254.255.248/30

No need for cell reboot.

Edit 03/10/2017: Existing Org VDC networks can be migrated from traditional to DLR or sub-interface based networks in all directions in non-disruptive way with running VMs attached.

 

vRealize Operations Management Pack for NSX-V and Log Insight Integration

Quick post about an issue I discovered in my lab during upgrade to NSX 6.3.3. This particular NSX version has a silent new feature that verifies if syslog configuration on Edges is correct. If the syslog entry is incorrect (it is not an IP address or FQDN with at least one dot character or does not have TCP/UDP protocol specified) it will not let you save it. This however also means that older Edges (with version 6.3.2 or older) that have incorrect syslog setting will fail to be upgraded as the incorrect config will not be accepted.

So how does it relate to the title of the article? If you have vROps in your environment with NSX-V management pack and you have enabled Log Insight integration, the Management Pack will configure syslog on all NSX components. Unfortunately in my case it configures them incorrectly with only hostname and no protocol. This reconfiguration happens roughly every hour. This might be especially annoying in vCloud Director environment where all the Edges are initially deployed with syslog setting specified by VCD, but then are changed within an hour by vROps to something different.

Anyway, the remediation is simple. Disable the Log Insight integration of the vROps NSX Management Pack as shown on the picture below.

Org VDC Edge Gateway CPU/RAM Reservations

vCloud Director 8.20 allows deployment of Org VDC Edge Gateways in 4 different form factors from Compact to X-Large where each provides different level of performance and consumes different amount of resources.

As these Edge Gateways are deployed by NSX Manager which allows setting custom reservations for CPU and RAM via an API call PUT https://<NSXManager>/api/4.0/edgePublish/tuningConfiguration, it is also possible in vCloud Director to set custom reservations.

Why would you change the default reservations? Reservations at VM (Edge) level reserve the resources for itself which means no other VM can utilize them in case they are unused. They basically guarantee certain level of service that the VM (Edge) from performance perspective will always deliver. In service provider environments oversubscription provides ROI benefits and if the service provider can guarantee enough resources at cluster scale, than the VM level reservations can be set lower if at all.

This can be accomplished by tuning the networking.gatewayMemoryReservationMultiplier and networking.gatewayCpuReservationMultiplier settings via cell-management-tool from vCloud Director cell. By default the CPU multiplier is set to 64 MHz per vCPU and the Memory multiplier to 0.5.

By default Edge Gateways will be deployed with the following reservation settings:

Org VDC Edge GW Default Resource Reservations

The following command will change memory multiplier to 10%:

/opt/vmware/vcloud-director/bin/cell-management-tool manage-config -n networking.gatewayMemoryReservationMultiplier -v 0.1

Note: The new reservation settings are applicable only for newly deployed Org VDC Edge Gateways. Redeploying existing edges will not change their reservation settings. You must either use NSX API to do so, or modify Org VDC Edge Gateway form factor (e.g. change Large to Compact and then back to Large) which is not so elegant as it will basically redeploy the Edge twice.

Also note that NSX 6.2 and NSX 6.3 have different sizing of Quad Large Edge. vCloud Director 8.20 is by default set for the NSX 6.3 size which is 2 GB RAM (as opposed to NSX 6.2 value of 1 GB RAM). It is possible to change the default for the reservation calculation by editing networking.full4GatewayMemoryMb setting to value ‘1024’

Setup Site-to-Site VPN between Azure and vCloud Director

My previous blog post was about setting up IPSec VPN tunnel between AWS VPC and vCloud Director Org VDC. This time I will describe how to achieve the same with Microsoft Azure.

vCloud Director is not among Azure list of supported IPSec VPN endpoints however it is possible to set up such VPN although it is not straightforward.

I will describe the setup of both Azure and VCD endpoints very briefly as it is very similar to the one I described in my previous article.

Azure Configuration

  • Resource Group (logical container object) – in my example RG UK
  • Virtual network (large address space similar to AWS VPN subnet) – 172.30.0.0/16
  • Subnets – at least one for VMs (172.30.0.0/24) and one for Gateway (172.30.255.0/29)
  • Virtual Network Gateway – Azure VPN endpoint with public IP address associated with the Gateway subnet above. Gateway type is VPN, VPN type is Policy-based (this is because Route-based type uses IKE2 which is not supported by NSX platform used by vCloud Director).
  • Local Network Gateway – vCloud VPN endpoint definition with its public IP address and subnets that should be reachable behind the vCloud VPN endpoint (81.x.x.x, 192.168.100.0/24)
  • Connection – definition of the tunnel:
    • Connection type: Site-to-site (IPSec)
    • Virtual network gateway and local network gateway are straightforward (those created previously)
    • Connection name: whatever
    • Shared Key (PSK): create your own 32+ character key using upper and lower case characters and numbers
  • Test VM connected to the VM subnet (IP 172.30.0.4)

azure-resources

vCloud Configuration

As explained above we created Policy Based VPN endpoint in Azure. Policy Based VPN uses IKE version 1, Diffie-Hellman Group 2 and no Perfect Forward Secrecy.

However selection of DH group and PFS is not available to tenant in vCloud Director on the legacy Org VDC Edge Gateway. Therefore the following workaround is proposed:

Tenant configures VPN on his Org VDC Edge Gateway with the following:

  • Name: Azure
  • Enable this VPN configuration
  • Establisth VPN to: a remote network
  • Local Networks: 192.168.100.0/24 (Org VDC network(s))
  • Peer Networks: 172.30.0.0/24
  • Local Endpoint: Internet (interface facing internet)
  • Local ID: 10.0.2.121 (Org VDC Edge GW internet interface)
  • Peer ID: 51.x.x.x (public IP of the Azure Virtual network gateway)
  • Peer IP: 51.x.x.x (same as previous)
  • Encryption protocol: AES256
  • Shared Key: the same as in Azure Connection definition

Now we need to ask the service provider to directly in NSX in the Edge VPN configuration disable PFS and change DH Group to DH2.

nsx-vpn

Note that this workaround is not necessary on Org VDC Edge Gateway that has been enabled with Advanced Networking services. This feature is at the moment only in vCloud Air, however soon will be available to all vCloud Air Network service providers.

If all firewall rules are properly set up we should be able to ping between Azure and vCloud VMs.

ping